The Resource Africa's cities : opening doors to the world, Somik Vinay Lall, J. Vernon Henderson, Anthony J. Venables, with Juliana Aguilar, Ana Aguilera, Sarah Antos, Paolo Avner, Olivia D'Aoust, Cyi-Yun Huang, Patricia Jones, Nancy Lozano Gracia, and Shohei Nakamura

Africa's cities : opening doors to the world, Somik Vinay Lall, J. Vernon Henderson, Anthony J. Venables, with Juliana Aguilar, Ana Aguilera, Sarah Antos, Paolo Avner, Olivia D'Aoust, Cyi-Yun Huang, Patricia Jones, Nancy Lozano Gracia, and Shohei Nakamura

Label
Africa's cities : opening doors to the world
Title
Africa's cities
Title remainder
opening doors to the world
Statement of responsibility
Somik Vinay Lall, J. Vernon Henderson, Anthony J. Venables, with Juliana Aguilar, Ana Aguilera, Sarah Antos, Paolo Avner, Olivia D'Aoust, Cyi-Yun Huang, Patricia Jones, Nancy Lozano Gracia, and Shohei Nakamura
Creator
Contributor
Author
Issuing body
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Cities in Sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing rapid population growth. Yet their economic growth has not kept pace. Why? One factor might be low capital investment, due in part to Africa{u2019}s relative poverty. Other regions have reached similar stages of urbanization at higher per capita GDP. This study, however, identifies a deeper reason: African cities are closed to the world. Compared with other developing cities, cities in Africa produce few goods and services for trade on regional and international markets To grow economically as they are growing in size, Africa{u2019}s cities must open their doors to the world. They need to specialize in manufacturing, along with other regionally and globally tradable goods and services. And to attract global investment in tradables production, cities must develop scale economies, which are associated with successful urban economic development in other regions. Such scale economies can arise in Africa, and they will flourish if city and country leaders make concerted efforts to bring agglomeration effects to urban areas. Today, potential urban investors and entrepreneurs look at Africa and see crowded, disconnected, and costly cities. Such cities inspire low expectations for the scale of urban production and for returns on invested capital. How can these cities become economically dense and not merely crowded? How can they acquire efficient connections? And how can they draw firms and skilled workers with a more affordable, livable urban environment? From a policy standpoint, the answer must be to address the structural problems affecting African cities. Foremost among these problems are institutional and regulatory constraints that misallocate land and labor, fragment physical development, and limit productivity. As long as African cities lack functioning land markets and regulations and early, coordinated infrastructure investments, they will remain local cities: closed to regional and global markets, trapped into producing only locally traded goods and services, and limited in their economic growth
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
307.1/4
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
no index present
LC call number
HN780.Z9
LC item number
C6 2017eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
World Bank e-Library
Label
Africa's cities : opening doors to the world, Somik Vinay Lall, J. Vernon Henderson, Anthony J. Venables, with Juliana Aguilar, Ana Aguilera, Sarah Antos, Paolo Avner, Olivia D'Aoust, Cyi-Yun Huang, Patricia Jones, Nancy Lozano Gracia, and Shohei Nakamura
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Overview Africa's Cities: Opening Doors to the World; The low development trap -- Africa's urban economies are limited to nontradable goods and services; Crowded, disconnected, and thus costly -- Africa's cities are limited to nontradables by urban form; Crowded cities; Disconnected cities; Costly cities; Closed for business, out of service: The urgency of a new urban development path for Africa; Cities are "closed for business"; Cities are "out of service"; Path dependence and interdependence; Springing cities from the low development trap
  • Capital misallocationInstitutional constraints; Ineffectual property rights; The example of Nairobi; Clear land and property rights; Land valuation and prices; Removing data and legal obstacles; Improving tax collection; Urban planning institutions and land use regulation; Strengthening capacity and resources for urban planning; Addressing coordination constraints across levels of government; Urban regulations; Streamlining administrative procedures; Relaxing planning standards; To build cities that work, make land markets work -- nothing less will do; References
  • Formalize land markets, clarify property rights, and institute effective urban planningMake early and coordinated infrastructure investments -- allowing for interdependence among sites, structures, and basic services; Opening the doors; Annex: African cities used in the analysis; References; Part I: Crowded and Disconnected African Cities; Chapter 1. Crowded with people, not dense with capital; Crowded with people; Slums: Workers' only option when urban economic density is low but highly concentrated; High population density at the city's core, rapid tapering on the outskirts
  • Not dense with capital; Not dense with buildings; Not dense with amenities, not livable; Case studies: Access to amenities in Dar es Salaam, Durban, and elsewhere in Africa; Low human capital; References; Chapter 2. Disconnected land, people and jobs; Disconnected land; Collections of small and fragmented neighborhoods; Spatial fragmentation; People not connected to people: High fragmentation, low exposure, little potential for interaction; People not connected to jobs; Lack of transportation infrastructure; Lack of money for transportation; Inaccessible employment; References
  • Part II: Africa's Low Urban Development Trap. Chapter 3. Costly for households, costly for firms; High prices, low incomes; High wages, high costs of doing business; References; Chapter 4. Africa's urban development trap; Cities closed for business; The "nontradables trap": Theory; The "nontradables trap": Evidence; Sunk costs, construction, and the expectations trap; References; Part III: Springing Africa from Its Low Urban Development Trap; Chapter 5. Clarifying property rights and strengthening urban planning; Why African cities fail to attract investment: An urban planner's perspective
Control code
ocn987255106
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (162 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781464810459
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
color illustrations, maps
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b37015175
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)987255106
  • pebc1464810451

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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