The Resource Dynamics of Language Contact : English and Immigrant Languages

Dynamics of Language Contact : English and Immigrant Languages

Label
Dynamics of Language Contact : English and Immigrant Languages
Title
Dynamics of Language Contact
Title remainder
English and Immigrant Languages
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Discusses disparate findings to examine the dynamics of contact between languages in an immigrant context
Member of
Cataloging source
AU@
Dewey number
306.44/0994
Index
no index present
LC call number
P130.52.A8 -- C59 2003eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Cambridge Approaches to Language Contact
Label
Dynamics of Language Contact : English and Immigrant Languages
Publication
Copyright
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Map and figures -- Map -- Figures -- Tables -- Series editor's foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Interrelationships -- 1.2 Aims -- 1.3 The field -- 1.3.1 Plurilingualism -- 1.3.2 Language attrition -- 1.4 The corpus -- 1.5 The Australian immigrant situation and the corpus -- 1.5.1 German -- 1.5.2 Dutch -- 1.5.3 Italian -- 1.5.4 Spanish -- 1.5.5 Vietnamese and Chinese -- 1.5.6 Some other groups -- 1.5.7 Multi-vintage groups -- 1.5.8 The more general environment -- 1.6 Policy -- 2 Dynamics of language shift -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Language demography -- 2.2.1 Shift -- first generation (overseas-born) -- 2.2.2 Shift -- second generation (Australian-born) -- 2.2.2.1 Exogamy (individual) -- 2.2.3 Age (individual) -- 2.2.4 Time (individual and group) -- 2.2.5 Gender (individual) -- 2.2.6 English proficiency (individual) -- 2.2.7 Place (group) -- 2.2.8 Studies in other countries -- 2.3 Who 'speaks' what language to whom, when and for what purpose? -- 2.4 Reading and writing -- 2.5 Models -- 2.5.1 Kloss: ambivalent factors -- 2.5.2 Conklin and Lourie -- 2.5.3 Edwards -- 2.5.4 Giles, Bourhis and Taylor: ethnolinguistic vitality/intergroup relations -- 2.5.5 Fishman et al.: quantitative model (1985) -- 2.5.6 Fishman: reversing language shift (1991) -- 2.5.7 Smolicz: cultural core values -- 2.5.8 Cost benefits -- 2.6 Concluding remarks -- 3 On models and terms -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 The troublesome terminology around 'code-switching' -- 3.2.1 Different types of 'code-switching' -- 3.2.2 Multiple transference -- 3.3 A terminological framework -- transference at different levels of language -- 3.3.1 Convergence and its relation to transference -- 3.3.2 Transversion -- 3.4 Some language contact frameworks
  • 3.4.1 Myers-Scotton and Jake: Matrix Language Frame model (MLF) -- 3.4.2 Poplack -- 3.4.3 Other models and constraints proposed -- 3.4.3.1 Government -- 3.4.3.2 Belazi/Pandit -- 3.4.3.3 Mahootian -- 3.4.4 Muysken: three types of 'bilingual speech' -- 3.4.5 Conjunction and PP constraints -- 3.4.6 Johanson: code-copying -- 3.4.7 MacSwan -- 3.4.8 Grosjean: modes -- 3.5 The treatment of morphological and syntactic transference and convergence -- 3.5.1 Internal and external change -- 3.5.2 Thomason and Kaufman and others -- 3.5.3 Language death -- 3.5.4 Drift and typology -- 3.5.5 Levelling and markedness -- 3.6 Some notes on the languages in our corpus -- 3.7 Concluding remarks -- 4 Dynamics of convergence and transference -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Convergence -- 4.2.1 Phonetic/morphophonemic/prosodic bilingual convergence -- 4.2.2 Trilingual convergence -- 4.2.2.1 Interlingual identification based on bilingual commonalities -- 4.2.2.2 Conversion formulae -- 4.3 Facilitation of different types of transference -- 4.3.1 Lexical transference -- 4.3.1.1 Multiple transference -- 4.3.2 Phonetic/phonological/prosodic aspects of transference -- 4.3.2.1 Prosodic transference -- 4.3.3 Graphemic transference -- 4.4 Grammatical convergence, transference and other changes -- 4.4.1 Auxiliary -- 4.4.2 Gender agreement on Italian modifiers and verbs -- 4.4.3 Plural affixes in German and Dutch -- 4.4.4 Gender marking on German and Dutch articles -- 4.4.5 Case loss and restructuring -- 4.4.6 Uninflected forms of Dutch verbs -- 4.4.7 Emerging typological change to SVO and fixed word order -- 4.4.8 'Composite Matrix Language' and syntactic convergence -- 4.4.8.1 Variation between syntactic convergence, syntactic transference and lexicosyntactic transference -- 4.4.9 Implicational scales? -- 4.4.10 Transference at several levels of language
  • 4.4.11 A note on theoretical implications -- 4.5 Divergence -- 4.5.1 Integration -- 4.5.1.1 Principles of gender assignment -- 4.5.1.2 Some markers of non-integration -- 4.5.1.3 Dummy verbs -- 4.6 Ethnolects -- 4.6.1 The case of a disappearing ethnolect -- 4.6.2 More recent and emerging ethnolects -- 4.7 Concluding remarks -- 5 Dynamics of transversion -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Sociolinguistic and discourse motivation for transversion -- 5.3 Facilitation as a concept -- 5.3.1 Lexical facilitation -- 5.3.1.1 Trigger-words -- 5.3.1.2 Anticipational transversion -- 5.3.1.3 Lexical facilitation and Muysken's 'congruent lexicalization' -- 5.3.1.4 The switch back -- 5.3.1.5 Comparative analysis -- 5.3.1.6 Bi-and trilinguals -- 5.3.1.7 Lexical facilitation and the contravention of grammatical constraints -- 5.3.1.8 Hesitation and transversion -- 5.3.2 Tonal facilitation -- 5.3.3 Syntactic overlap/transference/convergence (secondary facilitation) -- 5.3.4 Closing remarks on facilitation -- 5.4 Collocations -- 5.5 Directionality of lexical transference and transversion, especially in elderly bilinguals -- 5.6 Very dense transversion and convergence -- 5.7 Modes -- 5.8 'Code-switching', turnover and language shift -- 5.9 Concluding remarks and reassessment of models -- 6 Dynamics of plurilingual processing -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Demands on processing models -- 6.3 Models and what they can tell us -- 6.3.1 Levelt -- 6.3.1.1 Adaptations and applications -- 6.3.1.2 Challenges and revisions -- 6.3.2 Dell et al. -- parallel distributed processes -- 6.3.2.1 Adaptations and applications -- 6.3.3 Paradis -- storage hypotheses -- 6.3.4 Green -- inhibition/mental load -- 6.4 Detailed plurilingual issues -- 6.4.1 Syntactic convergence -- 6.4.2 Tonal transversion facilitation -- 6.4.3 Mental load, selection and facilitation -- 6.4.4 Access -- conceptual and phonological
  • 6.4.5 Broersma's critique -- 6.4.5.1 On the impossibility of generalizing specific potential trigger-words -- 6.4.6 Grosjean -- modes -- 6.4.7 Use and attrition -- 6.4.8 Progress summary -- 6.5 Integrating the sociolinguistic into a processing model -- 6.6 Towards a model of plurilingual processing -- 6.7 Concluding remarks -- 7 Dynamics of cultural values in contact discourse -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Pragmatic transference and code-switching to express pragmatic contrasts -- 7.2.1 A note on politeness -- 7.2.2 Diminutives -- 7.2.3 Address -- 7.2.3.1 European languages -- 7.2.3.2 Vietnamese -- 7.3 Modal particles in German, Dutch and Hungarian -- 7.3.1 German -- 7.3.2 Dutch -- 7.3.3 Hungarian -- 7.4 Modal particle use among plurilinguals -- 7.4.1 German -- 7.4.2 Dutch -- 7.4.3 Hungarian -- 7.4.4 Comparison between the languages -- 7.4.4.1 Dutch and German of trilinguals -- 7.4.4.2 German and Hungarian of trilinguals -- 7.5 English discourse markers and their transference -- 7.5.1 Discourse markers -- 7.5.2 Transference into the community languages -- 7.5.3 Comparison of corpora -- 7.6 Comparison of modal particle and discourse marker incidence -- 7.7 Concluding remarks -- 8 Towards a synthesis -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Data -- 8.2.1 The language factor -- 8.3 The culture factor -- 8.4 Trilinguals vs. bilinguals -- 8.5 Generation/vintage -- 8.6 The sociolinguistic factor -- 8.7 Concluding remarks -- Notes -- 1 INTRODUCTION -- 2 DYNAMICS OF LANGUAGE SHIFT -- 3 ON MODELS AND TERMS -- 4 DYNAMICS OF CONVERGENCE AND TRANSFERENCE -- 5 DYNAMICS OF TRANSVERSION -- 6 DYNAMICS OF PLURILINGUAL PROCESSING -- 7 DYNAMICS OF CULTURAL VALUES IN CONTACT DISCOURSE -- References -- Index of authors -- Index of languages -- Index of subjects
Control code
ocn974634611
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (300 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781139146449
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b35836969
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)974634611
  • sks1139146440

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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