The Resource Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, Volume 1, Sinusoidal Vibration, Christian Lalanne

Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, Volume 1, Sinusoidal Vibration, Christian Lalanne

Label
Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, Volume 1, Sinusoidal Vibration
Title
Mechanical vibration and shock analysis
Title number
Volume 1
Title part
Sinusoidal Vibration
Statement of responsibility
Christian Lalanne
Title variation
Sinusoidal vibration
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Everything engineers need to know about mechanical vibration and shock ... in one authoritative reference work! This fully updated and revised 3rd edition addresses the entire field of mechanical vibration and shock as one of the most important types of load and stress applied to structures, machines and components in the real world. Examples include everything from the regular and predictable loads applied to turbines, motors or helicopters by the spinning of their constituent parts to the ability of buildings to withstand damage from wind loads or explosions, and the n
Member of
Cataloging source
E7B
Dewey number
530.41
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QC173.4.C65
LC item number
.L353 2014eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Mechanical Engineering and Solid Mechanics Series
Label
Mechanical vibration and shock analysis, Volume 1, Sinusoidal Vibration, Christian Lalanne
Publication
Copyright
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Foreword to Series; Introduction; List of Symbols; Chapter 1. The Need; 1.1. The need to carry out studies into vibrations and mechanical shocks; 1.2. Some real environments; 1.2.1. Sea transport; 1.2.2. Earthquakes; 1.2.3. Road vibratory environment; 1.2.4. Rail vibratory environment; 1.2.5. Propeller airplanes; 1.2.6. Vibrations caused by jet propulsion airplanes; 1.2.7. Vibrations caused by turbofan aircraft; 1.2.8. Helicopters; 1.3. Measuring vibrations and shocks; 1.4. Filtering; 1.4.1. Definitions; 1.4.2. Digital filters
  • 1.5. Digitizing the signal1.5.1. Signal sampling frequency; 1.5.2. Quantization error; 1.6. Reconstructing the sampled signal; 1.7. Characterization in the frequency domain; 1.8. Elaboration of the specifications; 1.9. Vibration test facilities; 1.9.1. Electro-dynamic exciters; 1.9.2. Hydraulic actuators; 1.9.3. Test Fixtures; Chapter 2. Basic Mechanics; 2.1. Basic principles of mechanics; 2.1.1. Principle of causality; 2.1.2. Concept of force; 2.1.3. Newton's first law (inertia principle); 2.1.4. Moment of a force around a point; 2.1.5. Fundamental principle of dynamics (Newton's second law)
  • 2.1.6. Equality of action and reaction (Newton's third law)2.2. Static effects/dynamic effects; 2.3. Behavior under dynamic load (impact); 2.4. Elements of a mechanical system; 2.4.1. Mass; 2.4.2. Stiffness; 2.4.3. Damping; 2.4.4. Static modulus of elasticity; 2.4.5. Dynamic modulus of elasticity; 2.5. Mathematical models; 2.5.1. Mechanical systems; 2.5.2. Lumped parameter systems; 2.5.3. Degrees of freedom; 2.5.4. Mode; 2.5.5. Linear systems; 2.5.6. Linear one-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems; 2.6. Setting an equation for n degrees-of-freedom lumped parameter mechanical system
  • 2.6.1. Lagrange equations2.6.2. D'Alembert's principle; 2.6.3. Free-body diagram; Chapter 3. Response of a Linear One-Degree-of-Freedom Mechanical System to an Arbitrary Excitation; 3.1. Definitions and notation; 3.2. Excitation defined by force versus time; 3.3. Excitation defined by acceleration; 3.4. Reduced form; 3.4.1. Excitation defined by a force on a mass or by an acceleration of support; 3.4.2. Excitation defined by velocity or displacement imposed on support; 3.5. Solution of the differential equation of movement; 3.5.1. Methods; 3.5.2. Relative response; 3.5.3. Absolute response
  • 3.5.4. Summary of main results3.6. Natural oscillations of a linear one-degree-of-freedom system; 3.6.1. Damped aperiodic mode; 3.6.2. Critical aperiodic mode; 3.6.3. Damped oscillatory mode; Chapter 4. Impulse and Step Responses; 4.1. Response of a mass-spring system to a unit step function (step or indicial response); 4.1.1. Response defined by relative displacement; 4.1.2. Response defined by absolute displacement, velocity or acceleration; 4.2. Response of a mass-spring system to a unit impulse excitation; 4.2.1. Response defined by relative displacement
Control code
ocn880450159
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
Third edition
Extent
1 online resource (447 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781848216440
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b33549242
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)880450159
  • pebcs1118931106

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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