The Resource Rethinking infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean : spending better to achieve more, Marianne Fay, Luis Alberto Andrés, Charles Fox, Ulf Narloch, Stéphane Straub, and Michael Slawson

Rethinking infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean : spending better to achieve more, Marianne Fay, Luis Alberto Andrés, Charles Fox, Ulf Narloch, Stéphane Straub, and Michael Slawson

Label
Rethinking infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean : spending better to achieve more
Title
Rethinking infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean
Title remainder
spending better to achieve more
Statement of responsibility
Marianne Fay, Luis Alberto Andrés, Charles Fox, Ulf Narloch, Stéphane Straub, and Michael Slawson
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) does not have the infrastructure it needs, or deserves, given its income. Many argue that the solution is to spend more; by contrast, this report has one main message: Latin America can dramatically narrow its infrastructure service gap by spending efficiently on the right things. This report asks three questions: what should LAC countries' goals be? How can these goals be achieved as cost-effectively as possible? And who should pay to reach these goals? In doing so, we drop the 'infrastructure gap' notion, favoring an approach built on identifying the 'service gap'. Benchmarking Latin America in this way reveals clear strengths and weaknesses. Access to water and electricity is good, with the potential for the region's electricity sector to drive competitive advantage; by contrast, transport and sanitation should be key focus areas for further development. The report also identifies and analyses some of the emerging challenges for the region-climate change, increased demand and urbanization-that will put increasing pressure on infrastructure and policy makers alike. Improving the region's infrastructure performance in the context of tight fiscal space will require spending better on well identified priorities. Unlike most infrastructure diagnostics, this report argues that much of what is needed lies outside the infrastructure sector - in the form of broader government issues-from competition policy, to budgeting rules that no longer solely focus on controlling cash expenditures. We also find that traditional recommendations continue to apply regarding independent, well-performing regulators and better corporate governance, and highlight the critical importance of cost recovery where feasible and desirable, as the basis for future commercial finance of infrastructure services. Latin America has the means and potential to do better; and it can do so by spending more efficiently on the right things
  • Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) does not have the infrastructure it needs, or deserves, given its income. Many argue that the solution is to spend more; by contrast, this report has one main message: Latin America can dramatically narrow its infrastructure service gap by spending efficiently on the right things. This report asks three questions: what should LAC countries' goals be? How can these goals be achieved as cost-effectively as possible? And who should pay to reach these goals? In doing so, we drop the 'infrastructure gap' notion, favoring an approach built on identifying the 'service gap'. Benchmarking Latin America in this way reveals clear strengths and weaknesses. Access to water and electricity is good, with the potential for the region's electricity sector to drive competitive advantage; by contrast, transport and sanitation should be key focus areas for further development. The report also identifies and analyses some of the emerging challenges for the region--climate change, increased demand and urbanization--that will put increasing pressure on infrastructure and policy makers alike. Improving the region's infrastructure performance in the context of tight fiscal space will require spending better on well identified priorities. Unlike most infrastructure diagnostics, this report argues that much of what is needed lies outside the infrastructure sector--in the form of broader government issues, from competition policy, to budgeting rules that no longer solely focus on controlling cash expenditures. We also find that traditional recommendations continue to apply regarding independent, well-performing regulators and better corporate governance, and highlight the critical importance of cost recovery where feasible and desirable, as the basis for future commercial finance of infrastructure services. Latin America has the means and potential to do better; and it can do so by spending more efficiently on the right things
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
363.098
Government publication
international or intergovernmental publication
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
no index present
LC call number
HC130.C3
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Directions in development. Infrastructure
Label
Rethinking infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean : spending better to achieve more, Marianne Fay, Luis Alberto Andrés, Charles Fox, Ulf Narloch, Stéphane Straub, and Michael Slawson
Publication
Copyright
Note
"This report is a joint product of the Latin America and Caribbean Region's Vice-Presidency and the Chief Economist Office of the Sustainable Development Practice Group"--Acknowledgments
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; About the Authors; Abbreviations; Overview; What Is the Goal? And How to Set It?; How to Improve Services as Cost-Effectively as Possible?; Who Should Pay-And What Does It Imply in Terms of Financing Options?; Conclusions; Note; References; Chapter 1 Infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean: Modest Spending, Uneven Results; How Much Does Latin America Spend on Infrastructure?; What Is the Region Getting for Its Money?; Conclusions; Notes; References; Chapter 2 What Lies Ahead for the Region's Infrastructure?
  • Appendix A Public Expenditure Reviews Examined for This ReportAppendix B Procurement Performance of Latin American Countries: Relatively Good, but with Wide Variation across Countries and Indicators; Note; References; Boxes; Box 1.1 How Should Latin America Define Its Needs for Infrastructure Investment?; Box 1.2 Using a Fare Affordability Index to Guide a Subsidy Program in Buenos Aires; Box 1.3 Public Transport for All? Sexual Harassment Is a Major Issue on Public Transport in Latin America; Box 1.4 Innovative Schemes to Expand Sewerage Services across Latin America
  • Box 1.5 Latin America Has Pioneered Innovations to Make Markets More Economically and Technically EfficientBox 2.1 How Will Climate Change Affect Latin America?; Box 2.2 Nonprobabilistic Decision Making under Uncertainty Methodologies; Box 2.3 The Region Is Improving Its Business Environment for Renewable Energy Investments, although It Remains Far from the Good Practice Frontier; Box 3.1 The Political Economy of Reform: Conditions for Change; Box 3.2 Assessing Needs and Proposing a Pipeline-The Case of Infrastructure Australia; Box B.1 What Is the Benchmarking Public Procurement Database?
  • FiguresFigure O.1 With Greater Efficiency, Four Times as Many Water Utilities Could Access Private Financing; Figure O.2 Many Latin American Countries Chronically Underexecute Their Capital Investment Budget; Figure O.3 A Decision-Making Framework to Ensure the Judicious Use of Scarce Public and Concessional Finance; Figure 1.1 Public and Private Infrastructure Investments in Latin America Have Been Fairly Stable, 2008-13; Figure 1.2 Infrastructure Investment Levels Varied Enormously across Countries, 2008-13
  • Inefficient Public Spending May Limit How Much More Should Go to InfrastructureA Tight Fiscal Stance Limits How Much More Could Be Spent on Infrastructure; Climate Change Is Creating New Challenges, but Possibly New Opportunities; Urbanization and Changing Socioeconomics Are Complicating Matters; Notes; References; Chapter 3 The Road Ahead: Spending Better to Meet "Real" Infrastructure Needs; Focusing on Priorities-Setting the Right Goals Is Essential; Improving Utility Performance and Deploying Public and Concessional Finance Where It Is Truly Needed; Conclusions; Notes; References
Control code
ocn994882872
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 116 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781464811029
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
color maps, color illustrations
Quality assurance targets
unknown
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b37397321
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)994882872
  • pebc1464811024

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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