The Resource Sensory ecology, behaviour, and evolution, Martin Stevens, BBSRC David Phillips Fellow, Centre for Ecology & Conservation, University of Exeter

Sensory ecology, behaviour, and evolution, Martin Stevens, BBSRC David Phillips Fellow, Centre for Ecology & Conservation, University of Exeter

Label
Sensory ecology, behaviour, and evolution
Title
Sensory ecology, behaviour, and evolution
Statement of responsibility
Martin Stevens, BBSRC David Phillips Fellow, Centre for Ecology & Conservation, University of Exeter
Title variation
Sensory ecology, behavior, and evolution
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
BTCTA
Dewey number
573.87
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QP82
LC item number
.S83 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
Sensory ecology, behaviour, and evolution, Martin Stevens, BBSRC David Phillips Fellow, Centre for Ecology & Conservation, University of Exeter
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 207-242) and index
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • glg
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Introduction -- 1.Sensory Ecology, Information, and Decision-Making -- 1.1.What is Sensory Ecology? -- 1.2.Many Animals Detect and Use Sensory Information Humans Cannot Perceive -- 1.3.Asking Questions about Behaviour -- 1.4.Information -- 1.5.Future Directions -- 1.6.Summary -- 1.7.Further Reading -- pt. 2 Sensory Processing -- 2.Sensing the World -- 2.1.Signal Detection -- 2.2.Chemical -- 2.3.Electricity -- 2.4.Light -- 2.5.Magnetic -- 2.6.Mechanical -- 2.7.Sound -- 2.8.Future Directions -- 2.9.Summary -- 2.10.Further Reading -- 3.Encoding Information -- 3.1.Contrast and Receptive Fields in Vision -- 3.2.Sound Localization in Barn Owls -- 3.3.Echolocation -- 3.4.Olfactory Processing -- 3.5.Common Principles across Species and Modalities -- 3.6.Future Directions -- 3.7.Summary -- 3.8.Further Reading -- 4.Sensory Systems: Trade-Offs, Costs, and Sensory Integration -- 4.1.Energetic Costs of Sensory Systems --
  • Contents note continued: 4.2.When Are Sensory Systems Optimized for One Task Rather than Being Generalized for Many? -- 4.3.Trade-Offs in Processing Different Components of Stimuli -- 4.4.Integrating the Senses -- 4.5.Future Directions -- 4.6.Summary -- 4.7.Further Reading -- pt. 3 Communication -- 5.Signalling and Communication -- 5.1.Signals and Cues -- 5.2.Signal Components -- 5.3.Strategic and Efficacy Costs of Signals -- 5.4.What is Communication? -- 5.5.There is More to Communication than Just Sensory Systems -- 5.6.Future Directions -- 5.7.Summary -- 5.8.Further Reading -- 6.Multimodal Signals and Communication -- 6.1.Multimodal, Multicomponent, and Complex Signals -- 6.2.What Advantages do Multimodal Signals Provide? -- 6.3.A Framework for Multimodal Signals Based on Influence? -- 6.4.Examples of Multimodal Communication -- 6.5.True Multimodality or Multiple Receivers? -- 6.6.Future Directions -- 6.7.Summary -- 6.8.Further Reading --
  • Contents note continued: 7.Trade-Offs and Costs in Signalling -- 7.1.Physiological Costs -- 7.2.Eavesdropping by Predators and Parasitoids -- 7.3.How do Animals Balance the Risks of Eavesdropping with Communication? -- 7.4.Multiple Functions and Trade-Offs in Signal Form -- 7.5.Future Directions -- 7.6.Summary -- 7.7.Further Reading -- 8.Deception, Mimicry, and Sensory Exploitation -- 8.1.Exploitation and Biases -- 8.2.Supernormal Stimuli -- 8.3.Anti-Predator Defences: Mimicry and Exploitation -- 8.4.Foraging and Prey Capture -- 8.5.Aggressive Mimicry -- 8.6.Sensory Exploitation by Brood Parasites -- 8.7.Future Directions -- 8.8.Summary -- 8.9.Further Reading -- pt. 4 Diversification and Divergence -- 9.Arms Races, Coevolution, and Diversification -- 9.1.Arms Races and Coevolution -- 9.2.Predators and Prey -- 9.3.Brood Parasites -- 9.4.Future Directions -- 9.5.Summary -- 9.6.Further Reading -- 10.Adapting to the Environment -- 10.1.Signal Transmission and the Environment --
  • Contents note continued: 10.2.Signal Form Under Different Environments -- 10.3.Sensory Plasticity and the Environment -- 10.4.Tuning of Sensory Systems to Habitats -- 10.5.Coping with Environmental Noise -- 10.6.Future Directions -- 10.7.Summary -- 10.8.Further Reading -- 11.Divergence, Sensory Drive, and Speciation -- 11.1.Divergence and the Environment -- 11.2.Elaboration versus Innovation -- 11.3.Examples of Divergence and Speciation -- 11.4.Sensory Drive and Speciation -- 11.5.Future Work -- 11.6.Summary -- 11.7.Further Reading -- pt. 5 Conclusions -- 12.Concluding Remarks -- 12.1.Information is a Concept Linked to the Receiver's Sensory System -- 12.2.Communication -- 12.3.Life's Diversity -- 12.4.How Best Can Sensory Ecology Develop from Here?
Control code
000050540772
Dimensions
26 cm
Edition
First edition
Extent
xii, 247 pages
Isbn
9780199601783
Lccn
2012554461
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdacarrier
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations (chiefly color)
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b29760173
System control number
  • (OCoLC)843384648
  • md29760173

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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