The Resource The reformation of faith in the context of late medieval theology and piety : essays by Berndt Hamm, [edited] by Robert J. Bast

The reformation of faith in the context of late medieval theology and piety : essays by Berndt Hamm, [edited] by Robert J. Bast

Label
The reformation of faith in the context of late medieval theology and piety : essays by Berndt Hamm
Title
The reformation of faith in the context of late medieval theology and piety
Title remainder
essays by Berndt Hamm
Statement of responsibility
[edited] by Robert J. Bast
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ger
  • eng
Summary
Annotation
Member of
Cataloging source
REDDC
Dewey number
270.5
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
BR305.3
LC item number
.H36213 2004eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Studies in the history of Christian thought,
Series volume
v. 110
Summary expansion
This book comprises the first major collection of articles in English translation by University of Erlangen Professor Dr. Berndt Hamm, one of the most important and innovative scholars of the intellectual history of late-medieval and Reformation Germany. The articles herein trace the evolution of Christian theology and piety from the twelfth through the sixteenth centuries, employing a variety of disciplines and interpretative models to chart transformations with extraordinary attention to historical context. Hamm's intensive work with previously unknown sermon collections, devotional works, and pastoral care manuals from the later middle ages serves as the basis for a new appraisal of the lines of continuity and change between that era and the German Reformation
Label
The reformation of faith in the context of late medieval theology and piety : essays by Berndt Hamm, [edited] by Robert J. Bast
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 4
  • 171
  • Chapter 6
  • What was the Reformation Doctrine of Justification?
  • 179
  • I.
  • Criteria for Defining the Reformation Doctrine of Justification
  • 181
  • II.
  • Medieval Catholic Doctrine
  • 184
  • III.
  • III.
  • The Reformation Doctrine of Justification
  • 189
  • 1.
  • The Unconditionally Given Acceptance of Mankind
  • 189
  • 2.
  • Radical Sin
  • 193
  • 3.
  • Forms of Normative Centering: The Theology of Piety and Images of Piety
  • Grace Preceding Perfect Righteousness
  • 193
  • 4.
  • Simul Instus et Peccator
  • 196
  • 5.
  • The Eschatological Final Validity of Justification
  • 197
  • 6.
  • The Certainty of Salvation
  • 18
  • 200
  • 7.
  • Freedom and Absence of Freedom
  • 201
  • 8.
  • By Faith Alone
  • 202
  • 9.
  • The Bond Between Faith and the Biblical Word
  • 205
  • IV.
  • 10.
  • Breaking the Mold: the Contrast with Medieval Theology
  • 207
  • 11.
  • The Evangelical Understanding of the Person
  • 208
  • IV.
  • Luther's Lectures on the Epistle to the Romans as Evidence of the Reformation Doctrine of Justification
  • 209
  • V.
  • Three Exemplary Images of Piety
  • Further Prospects: the Intensification and the Boundaries of the Reformation Doctrine of Justification
  • 213
  • Chapter 7
  • Reformation "from below" and Reformation "from above". On the Problem of the Historical Classifications of the Reformation
  • 217
  • I.
  • Widespread Conceptions of Types and Phases of the Reformation
  • 217
  • II.
  • Factors "from above" in the Broad Reformation Movement before 1525
  • 24
  • 224
  • 1.
  • The 'prae' of the Educated Upper Strata of Society
  • 224
  • 2.
  • The Reformation of the Middle
  • 227
  • 3.
  • The Authoritarian Orientation of the Reformers before 1525
  • 231
  • V.
  • III.
  • Factors of the Early Reformation Movement within the Later Government of the Church by Secular Authorities
  • 240
  • 1.
  • After-effects of the Reformation of the "Common Man" in the Authorities' Governance of the Church
  • 240
  • 2.
  • Theological Continuity
  • 245
  • IV.
  • The Centering of Piety around the Passion, Mercy, and Trust
  • The Outlook
  • 250
  • Chapter 8
  • How Innovative was the Reformation?
  • 254
  • II.
  • Four Categories of Reforming Innovation
  • 258
  • III.
  • The Double Integrative Model: Long-term Change Integrated in Transition and Transition Integrated in Long-Term Change
  • 32
  • 266
  • Chapter 9
  • The Place of the Reformation in the Second Christian Millennium
  • 273
  • I.
  • The Effects of the Reformation and the Question of its Relevance
  • 273
  • II.
  • The Reformation as a Breach in the System
  • 275
  • Chapter 1
  • VI.
  • III.
  • The Medieval Catholic Synthesis of Divine and Earthly
  • 275
  • IV.
  • The Reformation as Desacralization of the World and Humanity
  • 278
  • V.
  • The New Understanding of Holiness
  • 280
  • VI.
  • From the Centering of the Late Middle Ages to the Centering of the Reformation: Continuity and Upheaval
  • The Reformation as a Break in the Religio-historical Logic of Gift and Return
  • 282
  • VII.
  • The Reformation as a Continuation of Medieval Trends
  • 285
  • VIII.
  • Differing Kinds of Continuation of the Middle Ages: Qualitative Leap and Reinforcement or Acceleration
  • 287
  • IX.
  • The Reformation as a Driving Force of Modernization
  • 43
  • 289
  • X.
  • The Relationship of the Reformation to Emancipative Modernity
  • 291
  • XI.
  • The Relationship of the Reformation to Repressive Modernity
  • 295
  • XII.
  • Summary: The Reformation as Engine and Interruption of Modernity
  • 298
  • Chapter 2
  • XIII.
  • The Prospect: The Significance of the Reformation for the Future of Church and Society
  • 299
  • Between Severity and Mercy. Three Models of Pre-Reformation Urban Reform Preaching: Savonarola -- Staupitz -- Geiler
  • 50
  • I.
  • Urban 'dirigenti religiosi' of the Reformation and Late Middle Ages
  • 50
  • II.
  • Normative Centering in the 15th and 16th Centuries: Observations on Religiosity, Theology, and Iconology
  • Girolamo Savonarola: Preacher of God's Severity
  • 55
  • III.
  • Johannes von Staupitz: Preacher of God's Mercy
  • 65
  • IV.
  • Johannes Geiler von Keysersberg: Preacher between Severity and Mercy
  • 73
  • V.
  • Looking On to the Reformation
  • 1
  • 86
  • Chapter 3
  • Volition and Inadequacy as a Topic in Late Medieval Pastoral Care of Penitents
  • 88
  • I.
  • The Harrowing Question at the End of the Middle Ages
  • 88
  • II.
  • The Typical Solution provided by Johannes von Paltz (1511): Where there is Inadequacy, a Good Will Suffices
  • 91
  • I.
  • III.
  • The Further Lowering of the Minimal Requirement: If there is no Good Will, then Desiring to Desire is Enough
  • 95
  • IV.
  • Exoneration -- a Trend of the Late Middle Ages
  • 100
  • V.
  • Four Lines of the Theological Tradition of Comforting Exoneration for the Weak and Troubled
  • 105
  • VI.
  • Normative Centering: An Interpretive Category
  • A Vigorous Theology of Mercy, circa 1500: Johannes von Staupitz in comparison with the Late Franciscan Tradition
  • 114
  • VII.
  • The Insufficiency of Human Satisfaction and the Infinite Value of the Satisfaction of Jesus Christ
  • 120
  • VIII.
  • The Reformation in the Context of the Late Middle Ages
  • 125
  • Chapter 4
  • From the Medieval "Love of God" to the "Faith" of Luther -- A Contribution to the History of Penitence
  • 1
  • 128
  • I.
  • The Twelfth-Century Turn to the Inner Feeling of the Love of God
  • 128
  • II.
  • The Late-Medieval Transformation in the Understanding of Love, Penance and Contrition
  • 136
  • III.
  • Johannes von Staupitz: the Significance of his Understanding of True Contrition for Luther
  • 142
  • II.
  • IV.
  • Luther's New Understanding of Contrition: Faith is Love, but Love does not Justify
  • 147
  • Chapter 5
  • Why did "Faith" become for Luther the Central Concept of the Christian Life?
  • 153
  • I.
  • The Question from the Medieval Perspective
  • 153
  • II.
  • The Normative Centering of Religion
  • The Medieval Understanding of Faith: the Levels of Faith, Humility and Hope
  • 154
  • III.
  • What Luther Means by Faith: the Question from the Perspective of the Judgement of God
  • 163
  • IV.
  • Luther's First Commentary on the Psalms: Faith as Humility and Hope
  • 167
  • V.
  • Results and Consequences
Control code
ocm70750807
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 305 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004131910
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
illustrations
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b22222832
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)70750807
  • pebcs1423714334

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
Processing Feedback ...