The Resource Three prehistoric inventions that shaped us, David Martel Johnson

Three prehistoric inventions that shaped us, David Martel Johnson

Label
Three prehistoric inventions that shaped us
Title
Three prehistoric inventions that shaped us
Statement of responsibility
David Martel Johnson
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
599.93/8
Index
index present
LC call number
GN281
LC item number
.J59 2011eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Label
Three prehistoric inventions that shaped us, David Martel Johnson
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and indexes
http://library.link/vocab/branchCode
  • net
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface: Towards a More Complete Scientific Picture of our Species and its History ix; Acknowledgements xv; Chapter 1. The Oldest Question: What Separates Human Beings from All Other Creatures? 1; 1.1 Hummingbirds and Homo Sapiens 1; 1.2 Is there any such thing as human nature? 7; 1.3 Did a "Linguistic Rubicon" occur at a certain point in human history? 12
  • 1.4 The thesis of this book: The distinctiveness of present-day humans (including separateness stemming from their use of language) is not just a passive product of biological and historical changes, but also was partly self-created 16Chapter 2. Darwin and his Successors have Not Taken Proper Account of Culturally Created Human Characteristics 21; 2.1 What modern humans are like: A tangled knot science only has begun to untie 21; 2.2 Why culture is real 33; 2.3 It is misleading to suppose that the existence of cultural items depends on conscious stipulations 38
  • 3.3 Entrapment vs. attraction: What was it necessary for the first domestic animals to be like, in order for them to "Tame Themselves"? 633.4 What changes had to occur in humans' cultural life, before the domestication of animals could take place? 72; Chapter 4. Something else that influenced us: Sophisticated Language conceived as Invented rather than completely Innate, Socio-Cultural as well as Biological 77; 4.1 How did humans become able to speak? 77
  • 4.2 A preparatory comment: To say that certain humans invented language is not to claim (nor does it entail) that those same people also created everything language either includes or presupposes 814.3 A Semi-digression: Talking does not have to be associated with counting 82; 4.4 A key for distinguishing speech from codes (and thus also from the communication systems employed by many non-human animals) is to remember that the most important function of language is to enable subjects to think in new ways 95
  • Chapter 3. One Invention that pointed the way toward Present-day Human Nature: The First Domestication of Animals 493.1 Instead of beginning a review of our species' most important properties by talking about the complex and mysterious ability to speak, it is clarifying to focus first on the simpler, and earlier acquired, ability to tame and exploit some of our fellow creatures 49; 3.2 Two clues from early hominid history about the background of the nature we now possess: (A) The biological isolation of homo erectus, and (B) The "Pit of Bones" in Spain 55
Control code
ocn793207983
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xvi, 192 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781453901571
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
http://library.link/vocab/recordID
.b3603597x
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)793207983
  • acaebk1453901574

Library Locations

    • Deakin University Library - Geelong Waurn Ponds CampusBorrow it
      75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, 3216, AU
      -38.195656 144.304955
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